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  • Benjamin-Constant - Marvels and Mirages of Orientalism

    A leading Orientalist painter during the Third Republic in France, Jean-Joseph Benjamin-Constant was one of the great colourists of the period, and his work evokes the sights he had witnessed during his travels in Spain and Morocco, as well as reflecting the exotic contents of his studio. He was the creator of huge, architectural compositions, in which he set fierce-looking Moors and dispassionate odalisques. His history paintings, based on stories from the Bible and Byzantine history, were the culmination of his ventures into Orientalism, and his sparkling palette resulted in wonderfully chromatic and beautiful works. He also stands out as one of the era's great painters of decorative cycles, from his work in Paris at the Opera Comique and the Gare d'Orsay, to the Capitole in Toulouse. His reputation as a society portraitist, meanwhile, won him an international reputation among royalty and the aristocracy, particularly in England. Generously illustrated and written by an international team of specialists on late 19th-century French art, this is the first study to focus on this fascinating figure, offering new and unpublished research into the life of a famous yet today little-known artist and revealing him at work in his studio and at the Paris Salon, teaching at the Academie Julian and amidst the many foreign students and collectors who flocked round him.

  • Antony and Cleopatra

    From the prizewinning author of Caesar and How Rome Fell, a major new account of the charged love affair between Antony and Cleopatra, richly informed by military and political history

    A masterfully told--and deeply human--story of love, politics, and ambition, Adrian Goldsworthy's Antony and Cleopatra delivers a compelling reassessment of a major episode in ancient history.

    In this remarkable dual biography of the two great lovers of the ancient world, Goldsworthy goes beyond myth and romance to create a nuanced and historically acute portrayal of his subjects, set against the political backdrop of their time. A history of lives lived intensely at a time when the world was changing profoundly, the book takes readers on a journey that crosses cultures and boundaries from ancient Greece and ancient Egypt to the Roman Empire.

    Drawing on his prodigious knowledge of the ancient world and his keen sense of the period's military and political history, Goldsworthy creates a singular portrait of the iconic lovers. "Antony and Cleopatra were first and foremost political animals," explains Goldsworthy, who places politics and ideology at the heart of their storied romance. Undertaking a close analysis of ancient sources and archaeological evidence, Goldsworthy bridges the gaps of current scholarship and dispels misconceptions that have entered the popular consciousness. He explains why Cleopatra was consistently portrayed by Hollywood as an Egyptian, even though she was really Greek, and argues that Antony had far less military experience than anyone would suspect from reading Shakespeare and other literature. Goldsworthy makes an important case for understanding Antony as a powerful Roman senator and political force in his own right.

  • Vauxhall Gardens - A History

    From their early beginnings in the Restoration until the final closure in Queen Victoria's reign, Vauxhall Gardens developed from a rural tavern and place of assignation into a dream-world filled with visual arts and music, and finally into a commercial site of mass entertainment. By the 18th century, Vauxhall was crucial to the cultural and fashionable life of the country, patronized by all levels of society, from royal dukes to penurious servants.

    In the first book on the subject for over fifty years, Alan Borg and David E. Coke reveal the teeming life, the spectacular art and the ever-present music of Vauxhall in fascinating detail. Borg and Coke's historical exposition of the entire history of the gardens makes a major contribution to the study of London entertainments, art, music, sculpture, class and ideology. It reveals how Vauxhall linked high and popular culture in ways that look forward to the manner in which both art and entertainment have evolved in modern times.

  • Lichens of North America - Updated and Expanded Keys

    Created in response to requests from longtime users, this addition to the acclaimed reference to North American lichens compiles updated and expanded keys for the identification of these fascinating organisms. An ideal laboratory resource, it covers over 2,000 species of lichens indigenous to the continent. There is no comparable volume available for classroom, workshop, or private use. A glossary is illustrated with photographs by Sylvia Duran Sharnoff and Stephen Sharnoff and drawings by Susan Laurie-Bourque, all from the original book. The revised keys are an indispensable identification tool for botanists, students, scientists, and enthusiasts alike.

  • Yale Library Studies V1

    The first volume of the new 'Yale Library Studies' series explores library architecture at Yale University. Featuring architectural drawings, maps and photographs by Paul Rudolph, Philip Johnson, Eero Saarinen and many other notable architects, as well as essays by Robert A. M. Stern, Charles Gwathmey and others, it presents a unique record of the buildings that have housed the Yale Library over the past several hundred years.

  • Ink Art - Past and Present in Contemporary China

    An illuminating investigation into how contemporary Chinese artists have reinterpreted past traditions to forge new artistic paths

    The Chinese tradition of "ink art" stretches far beyond works in ink, to embrace a set of aesthetic principles centered on renewal and reinterpretation of the past. The 80 works, by 40 contemporary artists, featured in InkArt range from variations on the written word to radical abstractions to contemporary landscapes, and represent media as diverse as photography, video, ceramic, wood, bronze, and stainless steel--as well as traditional ink (which might be on cardboard, polyester, or the human body). They include such iconic pieces as Book from the Sky by Xu Bing and Han Jar Overpainted with Coca ColaLogo by Ai Weiwei, "pseudo-characters" by Gu Wenda, handscrolls by Liu Dan, and videos and animation by Qiu Anxiong and Chen Shaoxiong. The illuminating texts give a history of contemporary Chinese ink painting and how it is perceived in the West. A discussion of the works themselves show how they respond to, subvert, or reinterpret the traditional idioms to define a modern artistic identity that remains both Chinese and global.

  • Mrs. Mattingly′s Miracle - The Prince, the Widow, and the Cure that Shocked Wasington City

    In 1824 in Washington, D.C., Ann Mattingly, widowed sister of the city's mayor, was miraculously cured of a ravaging cancer. Just days, or perhaps even hours, from her predicted demise, she arose from her sickbed free from agonizing pain and able to enjoy an additional thirty-one years of life. The Mattingly miracle purportedly came through the intervention of a charismatic German cleric, Prince Alexander Hohenlohe, who was credited already with hundreds of cures across Europe and Great Britain. Though nearly forgotten today, Mattingly's astonishing healing became a polarizing event. It heralded a rising tide of anti-Catholicism in the United States that would culminate in violence over the next two decades.

    Nancy L. Schultz deftly weaves analysis of this episode in American social and religious history together with the astonishing personal stories of both Ann Mattingly and the healer Prince Hohenlohe, around whom a cult was arising in Europe. Schultz's riveting book brings to light an early episode in the ongoing battle between faith and reason in the United States.

  • Francis Picabia Catalogue Raisonne V 1

    This publication is the first of four volumes in the catalogue raisonne of Francis Picabia (1879-1953), one of the most significant, challenging artists of the 20th century. The works in Volume I range from Picabia's early pieces as an Impressionist in the 1890s to his Cubist and abstract paintings of 1912-14, which constitute landmarks in the history of modern art. This volume allows for new critical and scientific readings of his work and piques interest in his lesser-known pieces. Along with illustrations of each featured work, the book includes an introduction, chronology, bibliography, list of exhibitions, and indices.


  • Rediscovering the Ancient World on the Bay of Naples, 1710-1890

    The ancient Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 C.E., drew international attention when excavations commenced in the 1730s. As a result, the nearby city of Naples became a nexus of scholarship, cultural diplomacy, and tourism. This fascinating book examines responses to the excavations by 18th- and 19th-century monarchs, statesmen, scholars, and archaeologists, as well as by artists, architects, designers, writers, and tourists.

    Essays by leading art historians and archaeologists chronicle the exploitation of the sites through excavation, publication, and museum display, and discuss the wider influence of the recovered objects and architectural remains on art and design in Italy, France, Germany, and Britain. Unlike other publications that focus on the archaeological artifacts and their documentation, this extensively illustrated book presents the discoveries from the standpoint of how they were understood at the time.

  • Speer - Architect of Death

    A new biography of Albert Speer, Adolf Hitler's chief architect and trusted confidant, reveals the subject's deeper involvement in Nazi atrocities In his best-selling autobiography, Albert Speer, Minister of Armaments and chief architect of Nazi Germany, repeatedly insisted he knew nothing of the genocidal crimes of Hitler's Third Reich. In this revealing new biography, author Martin Kitchen disputes Speer's lifelong assertions of ignorance and innocence, portraying a far darker figure who was deeply implicated in the appalling crimes committed by the regime he served so well. Kitchen reconstructs Speer's life with what we now know, including information from valuable new sources that have come to light only in recent years, challenging the portrait presented by earlier biographers and by Speer himself of a cultured technocrat devoted to his country while completely uninvolved in Nazi politics and crimes. The result is the first truly serious accounting of the man, his beliefs, and his actions during one of the darkest epochs in modern history, not only countering Speer's claims of non-culpability but also disputing the commonly held misconception that it was his unique genius alone that kept the German military armed and fighting long after its defeat was inevitable.

  • Monet/Kelly

    Early in his career, Ellsworth Kelly (b. 1923) spent six formative years (1948-54) in France, where he discovered the late work of the Impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926). Visits to the remote island of Belle-Ile off the coast of Brittany in 1949 and a visit to Monet's house and studio in Giverny in 1952 inspired a series of drawings, as well as Kelly's first monochrome work, Tableau Vert. Kelly returned to France on subsequent journeys in 1965, 2000, and 2005, visiting Belle-Ile again and Provence, continuing to draw motifs depicted by Monet, as well as by Cezanne and Matisse. This publication includes two paintings and eighteen unpublished drawings by Kelly, bringing them together with nine paintings by Monet from his Belle-Ile series and from his garden in Giverny. All the works have been selected by Ellsworth Kelly himself. Essays by Yve-Alain Bois and Sarah Lees explore the significance of Kelly's work from this key moment in his career and the significance of the later paintings of Monet.

  • Iphigenia in Forest Hills - Anatomy of a Murder Trial

    "Astringent and absorbing. . . . Iphigenia in Forest Hills casts, from its first pages, a genuine spell -- the kind of spell to which Ms. Malcolm's admirers (and I am one) have become addicted."--Dwight Garner, New York Times

    "She couldn't have done it and she must have done it." This is the enigma at the heart of Janet Malcolm's riveting new book about a murder trial in the insular Bukharan-Jewish community of Forest Hills, Queens, that captured national attention. The defendant, Mazoltuv Borukhova, a beautiful young physician, is accused of hiring an assassin to kill her estranged husband, Daniel Malakov, a respected orthodontist, in the presence of their four-year old child. The prosecutor calls it an act of vengeance: just weeks before Malakov was killed in cold blood, he was given custody of Michelle for inexplicable reasons. It is the "Dickensian ordeal" of Borukhova's innocent child that drives Malcolm's inquiry.

    With the intellectual and emotional precision for which she is known, Malcolm looks at the trial--"a contest between competing narratives"--from every conceivable angle. It is the chasm between our ideals of justice and the human factors that influence every trial--from divergent lawyering abilities to the nature of jury selection, the malleability of evidence, and the disposition of the judge--that is perhaps most striking.

    Surely one of the most keenly observed trial books ever written, Iphigenia in Forest Hills is ultimately about character and "reasonable doubt." As Jeffrey Rosen writes, it is "as suspenseful and exciting as a detective story, with all the moral and intellectual interest of a great novel."

    "Iphigenia in Forest Hills is another dazzling triumph from Janet Malcolm. Here, as always, Malcolm's work inspires the best kind of disquiet in a reader--the obligation to think." --Jeffrey Toobin, author of The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court

    "A remarkable achievement that ranks with Malcolm's greatest books. Her scrupulous reporting and interviews with protagonists on both sides of the trial make her own narrative as suspenseful and exciting as a detective story, with all the moral and intellectual interest of a great novel." --Jeffrey Rosen, author of The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America

  • Fashion Plates - 150 Years of Style

    A sumptuously illustrated, encyclopedic chronicle of fashion and its trends, from the 18th to the early 20th century

    Prior to the invention of photography, European and American magazines used colorful prints to depict the latest fashion trends. These illustrations, known as "fashion plates," conveyed the cutting-edge styles embraced by the fashion-conscious elite and proved inspirational to the upwardly mobile. This lavishly illustrated book provides a comprehensive survey of 200 color plates from publications dating from 1778 to the early 20th century, accompanied by authoritative and fascinating texts. Organized chronologically and featuring both men's and women's garments, these lively and colorful vignettes not only are beautiful, but also deftly illustrate the evolution of fashion over time.

  • The New Testament

    From one of our most celebrated writers on religion comes this fresh, bold, and unsettling new translation of the New Testament

    David Bentley Hart undertook this new translation of the New Testament in the spirit of "etsi doctrina non daretur," "as if doctrine is not given." Reproducing the texts' often fragmentary formulations without augmentation or correction, he has produced a pitilessly literal translation, one that captures the texts' impenetrability and unfinished quality while awakening readers to an uncanniness that often lies hidden beneath doctrinal layers.

    The early Christians' sometimes raw, astonished, and halting prose challenges the idea that the New Testament affirms the kind of people we are. Hart reminds us that they were a company of extremists, radical in their rejection of the values and priorities of society not only at its most degenerate, but often at its most reasonable and decent. "To live as the New Testament language requires," he writes, "Christians would have to become strangers and sojourners on the earth, to have here no enduring city, to belong to a Kingdom truly not of this world. And we surely cannot do that, can we?"

  • Carrying Coca

    Coca bags, or chuspas, represent one of the most enduring and resilient forms in the rich history of Andean weaving traditions. These small, elaborately decorated bags have been a constant presence in the archaeological, written, and visual record of the Andes for at least 1,500 years. In the details of their design and decoration, chuspa styles are testament to centuries of shifting trends and technologies in Andean textile arts. However, as carriers of coca leaves, chuspas are much more than aesthetically pleasing and technically sophisticated artworks. For millennia coca leaves have occupied an essential and unparalleled place in the daily lives, social customs, and ritual practices of Andean communities, in which chuspas also play central roles owing to their actual and symbolic connection with coca. Worldwide reactions to the plant and legislation of its uses have affected Andean traditions surrounding coca leaves since the Spanish conquest of the Andes in the sixteenth century and continue into the present.

    Focusing on the collection of the American Museum of Natural History and examples from other museum collections around the world, this book examines the multifaceted history of coca bags, investigating their function and reception and the changes in their appearance. The book reveals how their history is a consequence not only of variations in Andean textile traditions, but also of the story of the sacred and contested substance they carry.


  • Anarchy & Beauty: William Morris and His Legacy, 1860-1960

    A beautifully illustrated portrayal of the life of the artist and writer who revolutionized Victorian society and whose legacy is still widely embraced today

    William Morris (1834-1896) was an artist, craftsman, designer, poet, polymath, and visionary thinker. Well known for advocating that objects of beauty be accessible to all, Morris had a tremendous impact on the British Socialist movement, the Arts and Crafts movement, the Garden City movement, as well as on successive generations of artists and thinkers in Britain and beyond. In this fascinating book, Fiona MacCarthy examines Morris's vision of a society in which art could flourish, and how this idea resonated over the ensuing century.
    Anarchy and Beauty takes the reader through Morris's fascinating career, from the establishment of his decorative arts shop (later Morris & Co.), to his radical sexual politics and libertarianism, and the publication in 1890 of his novel News from Nowhere, which envisions a utopian socialist society. MacCarthy then looks at the numerous artists and movements that bear the influence of Morris's ideas: Arts and Crafts and the Garden City, which took hold in both Europe and the United States; artists' communities that sprung up during the interwar years; and the 1951 Festival of Britain, whose mission was to bring the highest standards of design within the reach of everyone.

  • Caravaggio and his Circle in Rome - A Barbaric and Brutal Manner

    The Italian artist Caravaggio (1571-1610) had a profound impact on a wide range of baroque painters of Italian, French, Dutch, Flemish, and Spanish origin who resided in Rome either during his lifetime or immediately afterward. This captivating book illustrates the notion of 'Caravaggism', showcasing 65 works by Peter Paul Rubens and other important artists of the period who drew inspiration from Caravaggio; these pieces are the focus of a North American exhibition. Also depicted are Caravaggio canvases that fully exhibit his distinctive style, along with ones that had a particularly discernible impact on other practitioners. Caravaggio's influence was greatest in Rome, where his works were seen by the largest and most international group of artists, and was at its peak in the early decades of the 17th century both before and after his untimely death at the age of 39. Not since Michelangelo or Raphael has one European artist affected so many of his contemporaries and over such broad geographic territory. Essays by an array of major Caravaggio scholars illuminate the underlying principles of the exhibition, reveal how Caravaggio altered the presentation and interpretation of many traditional subjects and inspired unusual new ones, and explore the artist's legacy and how he irrevocably changed the course of painting.

  • Painted Glories - The Brancacci Chapel in Renaissance Florence

    In 1440, on the feast of Saints Peter and Paul, Florence unexpectedly defeated Milanese forces near the town of Anghiari in eastern Tuscany. Nicholas Eckstein reveals the impact of this celebrated victory on Florentine public life and how it could have triggered the custodians of the Brancacci Chapel, the Carmelite friars, to seek the completion of the frescoes by Masolino (c. 1383-c. 1436) and Masaccio (1401-c. 1428). Today, tens of thousands of people visit the Brancacci Chapel annually to gaze at the brilliant frescoes of Saint Peter's life. Universally recognized as a canonical masterpiece of the Florentine Renaissance, these glowing murals span the interior in long panels. The first serious examination to position the frescoes at the heart of Tuscan society and culture, Painted Glories teems with fascinating characters and intrigue. In swiftly paced prose, Eckstein explores the Chapel's history, medieval culture, and art patronage, progressively peeling back the story's layers amid the tumultuous politics of the fifteenth-century Florentine state.

  • Evangelical Disenchantment - Nine Portraits of Faith and Doubt

    Insightful portraits of nine public figures who became enchanted and then disenchanted with evangelical religion

    In this engaging and at times heartbreaking book, David Hempton looks at evangelicalism through the lens of well-known individuals who once embraced the evangelical tradition, but later repudiated it. The author recounts the faith journeys of nine creative artists, social reformers, and public intellectuals of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including such diverse figures as George Eliot, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Vincent van Gogh, and James Baldwin. Within their highly individual stories, Hempton finds not only clues to the development of these particular creative men and women but also myriad insights into the strengths and weaknesses of one of the fastest growing religious traditions in the modern world.

    Allowing his subjects to express themselves in their own voices--through letters, essays, speeches, novels, apologias, paintings--Hempton seeks to understand the factors at work in the shaping of their religious beliefs, and how their negotiations of faith informed their public and private lives. The nine were great public communicators, but in private often felt deep uncertainties. Hempton's moving portraits highlight common themes among the experiences of these disillusioned evangelicals while also revealing fresh insights into the evangelical movement and its relations to the wider culture.

    Featuring portraits of:

    - George Eliot

    - Frances W. Newman

    - Theodore Dwight Weld

    - Sarah Grimke

    - Elizabeth Cady Stanton

    - Frances Willard

    - Vincent van Gogh

    - Edmund Gosse

    - James Baldwin

  • Marking the Hours - English People and Their Prayers, 1240-1570

    Personal prayer books and the jottings in their margins tell us about their owners and about life in late medieval and Reformation England

    In this richly illustrated book, religious historian Eamon Duffy discusses the Book of Hours, unquestionably the most intimate and most widely used book of the later Middle Ages. He examines surviving copies of the personal prayer books which were used for private, domestic devotions, and in which people commonly left traces of their lives. Manuscript prayers, biographical jottings, affectionate messages, autographs, and pious paste-ins often crowd the margins, flyleaves, and blank spaces of such books. From these sometimes clumsy jottings, viewed by generations of librarians and art historians as blemishes at best, vandalism at worst, Duffy teases out precious clues to the private thoughts and public contexts of their owners, and insights into the times in which they lived and prayed. His analysis has a special relevance for the history of women, since women feature very prominently among the identifiable owners and users of the medieval Book of Hours.

    Books of Hours range from lavish illuminated manuscripts worth a king's ransom to mass-produced and sparsely illustrated volumes costing a few shillings or pence. Some include customized prayers and pictures requested by the purchaser, and others, handed down from one family member to another, bear the often poignant traces of a family's history over several generations. Duffy places these volumes in the context of religious and social change, above all the Reformation, discusses their significance to Catholics and Protestants, and describes the controversy they inspired under successive Tudor regimes. He looks closely at several special volumes, including the cherished Book of Hours that Sir Thomas More kept with him in the Tower of London as he awaited execution.

  • Art of Empire - The Roman Frescoes and Imperial Cult Chamber in Luxor Temple

    The Luxor Temple of Amun-Re, built to commemorate the divine power of the pharaohs, is one of the iconic monuments of New Kingdom Egypt. In the 4th century C.E., the Roman Imperial government, capitalizing on the site's earlier significance, converted the temple into a military camp and constructed a lavishly painted cult chamber dedicated to the four emperors of the Tetrarchy. These frescoes provide fascinating insight into the political landscape of the late Roman Empire and, as the only surviving wall paintings from the tetrarchic period, into the history of Roman art. The culmination of a groundbreaking conservation project, this volume brings together scholars across disciplines for a comprehensive look at the frescoes and their architectural, archaeological, and historical contexts. More than 150 stunning illustrations present the paintings for the first time in their newly conserved state, along with a selection of 19th-century documentary watercolors. This remarkable publication illustrates how physical context, iconography, and style were used to convey ideology throughout Rome's provinces.

  • Learning by Doing - The Real Connection between Innovation, Wages, and Wealth

    An important study of the relationship between technology, skills, and economic inequality that answers some of the most pressing economic questions of our time

    Today's great paradox is that we feel the impact of technology everywhere--in our cars, our phones, the supermarket, the doctor's office--but not in our paychecks. In the past, technological advancements dramatically increased wages, but for three decades now, the median wage has remained stagnant. Machines have taken over much of the work of humans, destroying old jobs while increasing profits for business owners. The threat of ever-widening economic inequality looms, but in Learning by Doing, James Bessen argues that increased inequality is not inevitable.

    Workers can benefit by acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to implement rapidly evolving technologies; unfortunately, this can take years, even decades. Technical knowledge is mostly unstandardized and difficult to acquire, learned through job experience rather than in the classroom. As Bessen explains, the right policies are necessary to provide strong incentives for learning on the job. Politically influential interests have moved policy in the wrong direction recently. Based on economic history as well as analysis of today's labor markets, his book shows a way to restore broadly shared prosperity.

  • Reynolds - Portraiture in Action

    A deeply researched and elegantly written study on Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792)--Georgian England's most celebrated portraitist and the first president of the British Royal Academy of Arts--this lavishly illustrated volume explores all aspects of Reynolds's portraiture. Mark Hallett provides detailed, compelling readings of Reynolds's most celebrated and striking works, investigating the ways in which they were appreciated and understood in his own lifetime. Recovering the artist's dynamic interaction with his sitters and patrons, and revealing the dramatic impact of his portraits within the burgeoning exhibition culture of late-18th-century London, Hallett also unearths the intimate relationship between Reynolds's paintings and graphic art. Reynolds: Portraiture in Action offers a new understanding of the artist's career within the extremely competitive London art world and takes readers into the engrossing debates and controversies that captivated the city and its artists.

  • Erwin Blumenteld

    A revelatory book about the life and work of an important fashion photographer and artist

    Erwin Blumenfeld (1897-1969) was one of the most influential photographers of the 20th century. His work offers a unique perspective on the society and politics of the 1930s through the 60s. Born in Berlin, Blumenfeld's peripatetic career took him first to Amsterdam and then to Paris, where his work in fashion photography began at Vogue in 1938. After two years in a French concentration camp, he made his way to the United States and established himself as an eminent fashion photographer. Over one hundred of his photographs featured on the covers of prominent fashion and general interest magazines, including Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, Life, Look, and Cosmopolitan. Often minimalist, mainly in color, these photographs testify to Blumenfeld's lifelong interest in experimentation.

    This landmark publication broadens our understanding of Blumenfeld's innovations, reuniting all the media used by the artist throughout his long career: drawing, photography, photomontage, and collage. The motifs of his experimental, sometimes overtly political, black-and-white photographs appear alongside numerous self-portraits and celebrity portraits, as well as the fashion photographs for which he is most known. Presenting some 150 images, this book provides a fresh understanding of Blumenfeld's photography for the commercial worlds of fashion and advertising.

  • Confessions of a Born-Again Pagan

    In this passionate and searching book, Anthony Kronman offers a third way--beyond atheism and religion--to the God of the modern world
    "An astonishing, . . . epically ambitious book. . . . An intellectual adventure story based on the notion that ideas drive history, and that to dedicate yourself to them is to live a bigger, more intense life."--David Brooks, New York Times
    We live in an age of disenchantment. The number of self-professed "atheists" continues to grow. Yet many still feel an intense spiritual longing for a connection to what Aristotle called the "eternal and divine." For those who do, but demand a God that is compatible with their modern ideals, a new theology is required. This is what Anthony Kronman offers here, in a book that leads its readers away from the inscrutable Creator of the Abrahamic religions toward a God whose inexhaustible and everlasting presence is that of the world itself. Kronman defends an ancient conception of God, deepened and transformed by Christian belief--the born-again paganism on which modern science, art, and politics all vitally depend. Brilliantly surveying centuries of Western thought--from Plato to Augustine, Aquinas, and Kant, from Spinoza to Nietzsche, Darwin, and Freud--Kronman recovers and reclaims the God we need today.